High-capacity transit experts reviewing Austin regional plans

From the latest Austin Mobility News.

A team of transportation experts from several America cities with successful rail systems have agreed to provide a peer review of the Austin regional transit plan, officials said last week.

Capital Metro executive Todd Hemingson told the Transit Working Group the peers will provide the review in partnership with the American Public Transportation Association, who last fall sent a delegation of transit executives from peer U.S. cities to Austin.

Earlier this year, the Transit Working Group developed and approved a long-term transit vision, downloadable here, following months of regional discussion and public meetings.

The peer review would be completed and reviewed early next year.

The Transit Working Group approved a long-term high-capacity vision earlier this year.

The Transit Working Group approved a long-term high-capacity vision earlier this year.

Transit Working Group members also took the next steps to examine financing methods to achieve a regional transit network by 2030.

The discussion and presentations focused on affordable options for regional participants as well as broad-based benefits for mobility, economic development and quality of life. A meeting replay can be streamed online here.

The City of Austin and Capital Metro will also soon recommend an urban rail project lead that will oversee the planning and outreach process to gather feedback and support for the urban rail component of the long-term regional transit plan, officials said at the Transit Working Group meeting.

Hemingson told the group, which is chaired by Mayor Lee Leffingwell and made up of leaders from the private and public sectors, that the City, Capital Metro and Lone Star Rail will work as a team with the project manager.

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2 Responses to High-capacity transit experts reviewing Austin regional plans

  1. Matt says:

    I trust/hope that the lack of stops shown in that Vision slide on the Crestview to Kramer segment of the Urban Rail is due to them not yet being placed, not implying that there will be no such stops. Not serving the neighborhoods between those points(even while those neighborhoods experience the adverse affects of increased railroad crossings and noise) seems short-sighted.

  2. Pingback: Project Connect News Conference « Project Connect

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